criar instagram no criar instagram


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/05/the-story-of-ireland.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bOovM1vZIuw

[starttext] A groundbreaking new history of Ireland in this landmark BBC series presented by Fergal Keane. Story of Ireland is an insightful and provocative account of Ireland's dramatic past, and how it has shaped the island of today. Focusing on the big turning points in Irish history – the Viking Invasion, the Famine, the Easter Rising and the War of Independence, to name a few – Neil Hegarty revisits and re-examines stories the Irish have told about themselves, challenging long-held myths in the process. Is Ireland's history an unusually violent one? Was the British government really to blame for the Famine? How did the events of the Civil War not only change Irish history, but how Ireland's history was told?

Episode One: The Age of Invasion

The series aims to explore Irish history using the historical facts and evidence while charting the origin and impact of the numerous myths that have been passed off as history in the past. Key to this approach is relating developments in Ireland to events and changes in Europe and the world at large as the centuries progress.

Areas discussed in the opening episode include the impact of early Christianity and monasticism in Ireland; the birth of Ireland's potent literary culture; the unique law tracts created by Irish lawyers that afford us remarkable insights into the day to day lives and habits of ordinary people nearly 1500 years ago.

Episode Two: The Age Of Conquest

As the English set foot in Ireland, there begins 800 years of British rule. This episode examines the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland and the huge upheavals and changes taking place across Europe at the time.

Episode Three: The Age Of Revolution

Spanning the Ulster Plantation to the Act of Union, this is an era that sees Ireland take centre stage in a much wider European conflict. This episode will also investigate Gaelic life and culture during the eighteenth century through poetry, music and the rise of a Roman Catholic middle class.

Episode Four: The Age of Union

A new area for exploration is Ireland's role in the British Empire - both in terms of military service - Irish regiments holding the Punjab for example, and in terms of intriguing Irish governors and political men posted in various corners of the British Empire.

Episode Five: The Age of Nations

The Boer War is of much forgotten significance to the Irish story in the early 20th Century. A strong theme in the programme is the exploration of Irish nationalism, the welding together of culture, physical force and blood sacrifice, from Patrick Pearse, Connolly and Larkin right through to the beginning of the period known as 'The Troubles' in Northern Ireland.

And also the opening up of the 60s under Sean Lemass brought in a new era of economic openness in the south and its eventual membership of the EEC. There is a look at some key moments in The Troubles. [endtext]

The Story of Ireland


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/05/the-vikings-europes-most-feared-warriors.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mp3zmRiYtoo

[starttext]This show looks at the Viking, fearsome warriors from Denmark and Norway who burst upon Western Europe, raiding and plundering at the end of the 8th century. They first targeted coastal monasteries, but later they constructed magnificent ships that could sail up rivers and sack inland towns.

The Vikings (from Old Norse vikingr) were seafaring north Germanic people who raided, traded, explored, and settled in wide areas of Europe, Asia, and the North Atlantic islands from the late 8th to the mid-11th centuries. The Vikings employed wooden longships with wide, shallow-draft hulls, allowing navigation in rough seas or in shallow river waters. The ships could be landed on beaches, and their light weight enabled them to be hauled over portages. These versatile ships allowed the Vikings to travel as far east as Constantinople and the Volga River in Russia, as far west as Iceland, Greenland, and Newfoundland, and as far south as Nekor. This period of Viking expansion, known as the Viking Age, constitutes an important element of the medieval history of Scandinavia, Great Britain, Ireland, Russia, and the rest of Europe.

Popular conceptions of the Vikings often differ from the complex picture that emerges from archaeology and written sources. A romanticised picture of Vikings as noble savages began to take root in the 18th century, and this developed and became widely propagated during the 19th-century Viking revival. The received views of the Vikings as violent brutes or intrepid adventurers owe much to the modern Viking myth that had taken shape by the early 20th century. Current popular representations are typically highly cliched, presenting the Vikings as familiar caricatures.

The Vikings were known as Ascomanni, ashmen, by the Germans, Lochlanach (Norse) by the Gaels and Dene (Danes) by the Anglo-Saxons.

The Slavs, the Arabs and the Byzantines knew them as the Rus' or Rhos, probably derived from various uses of ro?s-, i.e., "related to rowing" or derived from the area of Roslagen in east-central Sweden, where most of the Vikings who visited the Slavic lands came from. Archaeologists[who?] and historians[who?] of today believe that these Scandinavian settlements in the Slavic lands formed the names of the countries Russia and Belarus. The modern day name for Sweden in several neighboring countries is possibly derived from ro?s-, Ruotsi in Finnish and Rootsi in Estonian.

The Slavs and the Byzantines also called them Varangians (ON: V?ringjar, meaning sworn men from var- "pledge, faith," related to Old English w?r "agreement, treaty, promise," Old High German wara "faithfulness"). Scandinavian bodyguards of the Byzantine emperors were known as the Varangian Guard.[endtext]

The Vikings : Europes Most Feared Warriors


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-rome.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=prL19bq-3tw

[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 01 & 02 of 16: Rome.

If asked to define the glory of ancient Rome, many students of history will invariably cite its formidable military troops and allegiances, but the sharper observer will realize that the empire's prowess lay in its city design, architecture and engineering, from its aqueducts to its majestic Colosseum - elements that placed the civilization centuries ahead of its time.

Taking this as its central axiom, the History Channel special Engineering an Empire: Rome undertakes a documentary-style foray into ancient Roman buildings and city planning, via a combination of on-location footage and CGI illustrations; actor Peter Weller (Firstborn) hosts, telling the story of the Roman Empire from a structural standpoint, from Julius Caesar's ascension in 55 B.C. to the Empire's fall in 537 A.D. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Rome


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-egypt.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44F6G5Ehsls
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 03 & 04 of 16: Egypt.

oin actor and historian Peter Weller for a feature-length look at the monumental masterpieces that withstood the test of time to dazzle even the most advanced of 21st Century architectural enthusiasts.

These are the engineering accomplishments that have confounded historians for centuries, and virtually gave birth to the science of structural engineering.

Nearly two millennia before the Romans were building the most basic of shelters, Egypt's pharaohs were driving their architects to expand the boundaries of human potential and create one of the world's earliest superpowers.

From 3000 BC to the fall of Ramses the Great in 1212 BC, cutting edge computer graphics are complimented by interviews with the world's most celebrated historians to offer a captivating look at the society that created such wonders as the Great Pyramid of Giza. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Egypt


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-greece.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5d2-BmEa_YI
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 05 of 16: Greece.

Western Civilization has been influenced by many cultures, but it was born in Ancient Greece.

The Ancient Greeks laid a foundation that has supported nearly 3000 years of European history.

Philosophers like Aristotle and Socrates, Olympian gods, the beginnings of democracy and great conquering armies can be attributed to the Ancient Greeks.

This strong and charismatic people strategically harnessed the materials and people around them to create the most advanced technological feats the world had ever seen. From

The Tunnel of Samos: a mile-long aqueduct dug through a large mountain of solid limestone, to Agamemnon's Tomb, to The Parthenon, this episode examines the architecture and infrastructure engineered by the Greek Empire. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Greece


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-greece-age-of.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GdpYtF7V5Eg
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 06 of 16: Greece. Age of Alexander.

In 438 BC the Parthenon was completed.

This masterpiece is the crowning achievement for the Greek people.

Without Alexander the Great, it is possible Greece's Golden Era would have been just a footnote in history.

Tens of thousands would die during Alexander's relentless attacks on Persia and Egypt, yet, his armies carried Greek life, culture and values far abroad and this empire became known as the "Hellenistic" world.

Greece's amazing engineering achievements and ideas are still with us today. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Greece. Age of Alexander


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-aztecs.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZyB47qGXoI
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 07 of 16: The Aztecs.

In less than 200 years the Aztec's transformed themselves from a band of wandering nomads to the greatest civilization the New World had ever known.

What records remain of this amazing feat indicate they did it through brilliant military campaigns and by ingeniously applying technology to master the harsh environment they faced.

They built their capital city where no city should have been possible: in the middle of a lake.

The Aztec also practiced human sacrifice on an unprecedented scale and made many enemies.

By the time the Spaniards landed they had no trouble recruiting tribal allies to destroy the Aztecs.

This episode examines the architecture and infrastructure behind the New World's greatest, and last, indigenous society. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: The Aztecs


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-carthage.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=926GgYf8aYI
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 08 of 16: Carthage.

Carthage, a remarkable city-state that dominated the Mediterranean for over 600 years, harnessed their extensive resources to develop some of the ancient world's most groundbreaking technology.

For generations, Carthage defined power, strength and ingenuity, but by the third century B.C., the empire's existence was threatened by another emerging superpower, Rome.

However, when the Romans engineered their empire, they were only following the lead of the Carthaginians.

From the city's grand harbor to the rise of one of history's greatest generals, Hannibal Barca, this episode examines the architecture and infrastructure that enabled the rise and fall of the Carthaginian Empire. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Carthage


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-maya-death-empire.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s151jVxpx2E
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 09 of 16: The Maya: Death Empire.

At the height of its glory, this mysterious civilization ruled a territory of 125,000 square miles across parts of Guatemala, Mexico, Honduras, El Salvador and Belize.

What began as a modest population of hunters and gatherers expanded into more than forty flourishing city-states who engineered sky-high temple-pyramids, ornate palaces and advanced hydraulic systems.

Where did they come from and what catastrophes caused the collapse of this innovative civilization?

From the Temple-Pyramids at Tikal, to the royal tomb at Palenque, to the star observatory at Chichen Itza, this episode will examine the architecture and infrastructure that enabled the rise and fall of the ancient Maya civilization. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: The Maya: Death Empire


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-russia.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEzVTyAsyl0
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 10 of 16: Russia.

At the height of its power the Russian Empire stretched across 15 times zones, incorporated nearly 160 different ethnicities, and made up one sixth of the entire world's landmass.

What started as a few small principalities was shaped into an indomitable world power by the sheer force of its leaders.

However, building the infrastructure of this empire came at an enormous price.

As Russia entered the 20th century, her expansion reached critical mass as her rulers pushed progress at an unsustainable pace and her population reacted in a revolution that changed history.

From the Moscow Kremlin, to the building of St. Petersburg, this episode examines the architecture and infrastructure that enabled the rise and fall of the Russian Empire. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Russia


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-britain-blood-and.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJI4H4fnALM
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 11 of 16: Britain. Blood and Steel.

At its pinnacle, the British empire spanned every continent and covered one quarter of the Earth's land mass.

Through the centuries, the rulers of this enormous powerhouse used extraordinary engineering feats to become an industrial and military titan, loaded with riches.

Some of their many pioneering accomplishments include the world's first locomotive, a superhighway of underground sewers, the imposing and grand Westminster Palace, and the most powerful and technically advanced navy in the age of sail.

Using cutting edge CGI, this episode takes a look at the key leaders of the British empire--and explores the mark each left on society. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Britain. Blood and Steel


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-persians.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6cmvM5oj3Q
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 12 of 16: The Persians.

The Persian Empire was one of the most mysterious civilizations in the ancient world.

Persia became an empire under the Cyrus the Great, who created a policy of religious and cultural tolerance that became the hallmark of Persian rule.

Engineering feats include an innovative system of water management; a cross-continent paved roadway stretching 1500 miles; a canal linking the Nile to the Red Sea; and the creation of one of the Seven Wonders of the World, the Mausoleum of Maussollos.

The rivalry between Persia and Athens led to a 30-year war known as the Persian Wars, the outcome of which helped create the world we live in today. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: The Persians


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-china.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qsd05kjnayM
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 13 of 16: China.

For over 4000 years, the world's greatest empires have come and gone--only China has survived the test of time.

Century after century, China's regal emperors mobilized immense peasant armies to accomplish engineering feats unparalleled in human history.

Among the groundbreaking innovations were the world's longest canal and a naval fleet mightier than all those of Europe combined.

However, none can compare to the colossal 4,000-mile wall that stands as the most ambitious construction project ever built.

From such heights came spectacular death spirals, as dynasty after dynasty, consumed by vanity and greed was stripped of power by the people it had ruled. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: China


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-napoleon-steel.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LqRwxYy-aDE
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 14 of 16: Napoleon. Steel Monster.

Centuries after the fall of the Roman Empire, French kings struggled for control against the church and the aristocracy.

Chaos and bloody warfare rampaged and France stood on the edge of utter disaster as the French Revolution turned into a period of brutal repression.

From the ashes emerged one of the greatest military strategists in history, Napoleon.

Throughout his reign, France built brilliantly innovative, widely influential masterpieces that have given the world some of its greatest feats of engineering.

They include: The massive and majestic Notre Dame de Paris, the Canal du Midi, The Eiffel Tower, and The Arc de Triomphe, an enduring monument to the glory of France under Napoleon. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Napoleon. Steel Monster


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-byzantines.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJ0DRhRhAtY
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 15 of 16: The Byzantines.

As much of the world descended into the Dark Ages after the fall of Rome, one civilization shone brilliantly: the Byzantine Empire.

With ruthless might and supreme ingenuity, the Byzantines ruled over vast swaths of Europe and Asia for more than a thousand years.

It was Byzantium that preserved the classical learning and science that would one day give rise to the Renaissance.

The Byzantines constructed the ancient world's longest aqueduct, virtually invincible city walls, a massive stadium, and a colossal domed cathedral that defied the laws of nature.

This episode shows how the engineering feats of this great empire would betray them as an ancient light was extinguished in the glare of modern warfare. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: The Byzantines


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/engineering-empire-da-vincis-world.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MWyM8oDS54
[starttext] Engineering An Empire, looks at various civilizations throughout history, and examines the buildings, structures, and machines those civilizations developed that aided their transformations into empires.

Utilizing interviews with historical experts in each particular field, along with on-site location shooting and stunning CGI recreations of those empires' engineering feats, Engineering An Empire manages to shine new light on subjects you may have assumed were tapped out from repetition.

The use of CGI animated blueprints, buildings, cities and war machines, is an enormously helpful way of illustrating concepts for viewers who might have otherwise not grasped their importance from simple two-dimensional drawings.

Part 16 of 16: Da Vinci's World.

After the fall of Rome, Italy fell into a dark sleep, and wasn't reawakened until the 11th century.

Autonomous city-states emerged and these tiny republics began to revitalize their cities and build on a massive level not witnessed since the rise of Rome.

In the late 15th and 16th centuries, alliances among various city-states continually shifted as foreign superpowers tried to sink their claws into Italy.

The masters who are best known for creating the works of art and architecture of the Renaissance, were also the greatest military and civil engineers of the time. [endtext]

Engineering An Empire: Da Vinci's World


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-hagia-sophia.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Hz0B6GA6uM

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: Hagia Sophia


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-angkor-wat.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATo5d96st2k

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: Angkor Wat


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-machu-picchu.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pL4Zwh_Xqn0

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: Machu Picchu


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-petra.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IGqqeb4sm4

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: Petra


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-alhambra.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-oHBUfiL73M

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: Alhambra


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-stpauls-cathedral.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZsuKMSsYzw

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: St.Paul's Cathedral


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/04/ancient-megastructures-pyramids.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fy8cmZlBKek

[starttext] National Geographic Channel unlocks the secrets of revolutionary structures in a new series of Ancient Megastructures.

Certain landmarks have captured the imagination and awe of modern-day architects and engineers around the world as they work to solve the mystery of how their ancient forebears were able to construct such beautiful, timeless and revolutionary structures with none of the machines and materials available to modern engineers.

From the dreams that inspired them, to the blood and sweat that built them, discover the full story behind six magnificent structures that forever changed the landscape of architecture: Petra, Alhambra, St.Paul's Cathedral, Hagia Sophia, Machu Picchu and Angkor Wat.[endtext]

Ancient Megastructures: The Great Pyramid


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-quest-for-phoenicians.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBObLQZdeq8

[starttext] Hidden beneath Greek and Roman ruins lies a civilization lost to history.

The Phoenicians were people of the Levant, living among the Canaanites of the Old Testament and with a domain covering the eastern Mediterranean and beyond.

From 1200 BC to the razing of Carthage in 146 BC, the Phoenicians spread ever westward.

They were the true "lords of the sea," skilled and audacious seafarers, merchants and colonizers of the early Mediterranean world.

Artwork shows their influence on the ancient world: drawings of pyramids, paintings of King Solomon's temple and Phoenician inscriptions.

Egyptian Pharaohs bartered for their fine cedar, Persians enlisted their warships and soldiers: their 22-letter alphabet revolutionized language and diplomacy for their world - and ours. But their civilization was doomed to obscurity.

Their legacy lives on only in the imperfect histories of their Greek and Roman conquerors who described them as dishonest hucksters, not to be trusted. 'Jezebel' the shameless Biblical woman was in fact a Phoenician princess.

Stylized reconstruction scenes provide glimpses of ritual, rite and myth.

 But who were these intrepid, nomadic sailors?

Leading our search for the answers are two eminent scientists supported by the National Geographic Society; deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard and geneticist Spencer Wells.

Their quest takes us on adventures on the sea, within our genes and over land.

The film climaxes with revolutionary new data suggesting that both the Christians and Muslims of Lebanon are in fact descendants of the Phoenicians [endtext]

The Quest for the Phoenicians