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[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-quest-for-phoenicians.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBObLQZdeq8

[starttext] Hidden beneath Greek and Roman ruins lies a civilization lost to history.

The Phoenicians were people of the Levant, living among the Canaanites of the Old Testament and with a domain covering the eastern Mediterranean and beyond.

From 1200 BC to the razing of Carthage in 146 BC, the Phoenicians spread ever westward.

They were the true "lords of the sea," skilled and audacious seafarers, merchants and colonizers of the early Mediterranean world.

Artwork shows their influence on the ancient world: drawings of pyramids, paintings of King Solomon's temple and Phoenician inscriptions.

Egyptian Pharaohs bartered for their fine cedar, Persians enlisted their warships and soldiers: their 22-letter alphabet revolutionized language and diplomacy for their world - and ours. But their civilization was doomed to obscurity.

Their legacy lives on only in the imperfect histories of their Greek and Roman conquerors who described them as dishonest hucksters, not to be trusted. 'Jezebel' the shameless Biblical woman was in fact a Phoenician princess.

Stylized reconstruction scenes provide glimpses of ritual, rite and myth.

 But who were these intrepid, nomadic sailors?

Leading our search for the answers are two eminent scientists supported by the National Geographic Society; deep-sea explorer Robert Ballard and geneticist Spencer Wells.

Their quest takes us on adventures on the sea, within our genes and over land.

The film climaxes with revolutionary new data suggesting that both the Christians and Muslims of Lebanon are in fact descendants of the Phoenicians [endtext]

The Quest for the Phoenicians


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/aegean-legacy-of-atlantis.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwMemRSZNAg

[starttext] Archaeologists are unearthing data that may support the existence of the island Atlantis, once thought to be only a legend.

This is an exploration of the area that is considered to be the cradle of western culture

The story of Atlantis resonates for us even today with its mythic tale of a once mighty island empire vanquished by the sea.

But what if the accounts passed down to us by the likes of Plato rest not on fantasy but on an actual civilazation?

One that left undeniable proof of its very real existence among the vital, thriving cultures that lived on after Atlantis disappeared into the mists of legend?

Now, team up with archaeologists unearthing intriguing new data regarding the history of the region's fascinating, early civilizations.

Visit a candidate for the site of Atlantis on the Greek isle of Thera, where 3,000 years ago a highly advanced culture was destroyed by the most violent volcanic eruption in human history.

Then sail to Crete, Turkey and the Greek mainland on a search for the historical roots of the battle of Troy with its fabled Trojan Horse, the murdered king Agamemnon and even the origins of the man-eating Minotaur.

From detailed reconstructions of the people who lived during the golden age of the Homeric heroes to startling revelations of human and animal sacrifice, it's a dazzling voyage of discovery into the origins of western Culture.

A voyage that takes you to the shadow zone where legend and history combine to reveal the astonishing "Legacy of Atlantis."  [endtext]

Aegean: Legacy of Atlantis


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/birth-of-civilization.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rKuwTKEXNwY

[starttext] National Geographic presents an epic account of the first 8,000 years of our civilization - from man's emergence on the planet through his continued quest to dominate the world.

The Earth has witnessed the birth, growth and disappearance of numerous species, but one species - homo sapiens - set off to conquer the world.

Man hunted and domesticated animals, built cities and developed complex civilizations and created war in his quest to dominate throughout time.

Through CGI special effects, dramatic recreations and expert interviews, National Geographic brings 8,000 fascinating years in mankind's history to life.

How did human beings ascend to dominance on the Earth when so many other species perish? And what has his ascent meant for the planet?

This documentary from National Geographic tackles the entire span of human history--8,000 years--in order to tell the incredible story of mankind: the mastery of its environment, the growth of its cities, and the pall cast by its penchant for warfare.

Expert interviews, computer-generated imagery, and reenactments help bring to life this gripping account. [endtext]

Birth of Civilization


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-masters-of-river.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnsatmxY7Kc

[starttext] Around 2000 BC, a mysterious civilisation thrived along the Indus river, between today's India and Pakistan.

The countryside surrounding the cities was successfully farmed providing ample food supplies to the cities where craftsmen produced intricate artefacts and everyday utensils on an almost industrial scale.

Archaeologists began excavating the ruins of the Indus civilisation in the 1920s and although they have uncovered ample traces of its material culture, one big piece of the puzzle remains: no written text of sufficient length has been found yet making it impossible for researchers to decipher the Indus script.

Therefore the disappearance of this thriving civilisation around 500 BC remains a mystery.  [endtext]

The Indus: The Masters of the River


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-private-lives-of-pharaohs-12.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JVWbvVcLLhA

[starttext] In the first programme we take a look at the Eighteenth Dynasty pharaohs of Egypt.

The last pharaoh, Tutankhamun, died young at only 18 years old.

Were the Eighteenth dynasty plagued with a genetic disease, or was there another reason for their downfall?

Taking a DNA sample from Thutmose III, researchers hope to sequence the family genome all the way down to Tutankhamun. [endtext]

The Private Lives of the Pharaohs [1/2]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-private-lives-of-pharaohs-22.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qxfK9jmm78

[starttext] Part two asks the question of who built the pyramids and how were they built.

No records of how the pyramids were built has ever been found and this has given rise to all sorts of theories about how and why, but Egyptologists have now found the lost city of the pyramid builders and the secrets start to reveal themselves. [endtext]

The Private Lives of The Pharaohs [2/2]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-great-pharaohs-of-egypt.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-63zsET_zEc

[starttext] Pharaoh is a title used in many modern discussions of the rulers of all Ancient Egyptian dynasties.

The title originates in the Egyptian term, literally "great house", describing the royal palace.

Historically, however, "pharaoh" only started being used as a title for the king during the New Kingdom, specifically during the middle of the eighteenth dynasty, after the reign of Hatshepsut. [endtext]


The Great Pharaohs of Egypt


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/the-genius-of-archimedes-palimpsest.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uwidw12kctI

[starttext] Twenty-two centuries after Archimedes wrote his most revealing mathematical work, and eight centuries after a Christian monk erased what may have been the last surviving copy, the lost treatise has turned up and is being deciphered in a Baltimore museum. "Infinite Secrets" reports the story of the manuscript's amazing discovery and how modern technology is being used to read its startling contents.

Archimedes is famous for shouting "Eureka!" (Greek for "I have found it!") on stepping into his bath and realizing that its rising water level showed a way to measure the volume of his king's crown to determine if it was pure gold (it wasn't). The Einstein of his era, Archimedes had a sophisticated understanding of mathematics, including infinity, and designed marvelous war machines for his native Syracuse to use against invading Romans, one of whom killed him in 212 B.C. Relying on sophisticated image-processing techniques, scholars now believe that Archimedes was closer than anyone suspected to inventing calculus—the mathematical tool at the heart of advanced science and engineering.

Many of Archimedes' works disappeared during the Middle Ages, but some survived to help inspire the scientific revolution in the 16th and 17th centuries. One document that seemed irretrievably lost was his treatise The Method, which reputedly told how he achieved his brilliant results—secrets he revealed nowhere else.

But then in 1906 Danish scholar J. L. Heiberg discovered The Method, along with several other works by Archimedes, faintly visible beneath the bold lettering of a medieval prayer manual in an Istanbul library. A scribe in the 13th century had incompletely erased a 10th-century copy of Archimedes' work and had then written over it—a common practice that allowed reuse of valuable parchment and produced a palimpsest, or parchment or tablet used one or more times after a layer has been erased.

Fortunately, Heiberg photographed the palimpsest, because a few years later it disappeared in the turmoil surrounding World War I. But regrettably, many of Archimedes' words were illegible in the photos, and many others were lost in the folds of the binding. Heiberg also neglected to copy Archimedes' explanatory diagrams, which are crucial for understanding his thought processes.

All was set right in 1998, when the vanished palimpsest resurfaced at a Christie's auction in New York, having hidden for decades in an apartment in Paris. In the interim the book had acquired a shoddy new binding, a chronic case of mold, and a number of forged illustrations, apparently intended to increase the book's value. The forger didn't realize that the text covered by the inept fakes was itself priceless.

Even so, the palimpsest garnered $2 million from an anonymous high-tech billionaire, who promptly delivered it in a gym bag to the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, renowned for its rare book conservation department. There, specialists have gone to work on the ragged little volume, which curator William Noel proudly calls "Archimedes' brain in a box."

What a scribe once copied in the 10th century, a monk erased in the 13th, and Heiberg perceived only faintly, if at all, in the early 20th is now coming sharply into view thanks to the marriage of chemistry, computers, and multispectral imaging. It's a process Archimedes himself would have delighted to watch—while no doubt offering his expert advice.  [endtext]

The Genius of Archimedes: The Palimpsest


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/john-romer-ancient-lives-14.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnsNwwwHm2I

[starttext] How did ordinary Egyptians live in the time of the pharaohs?

Renowned British Egyptologist John Romer explores the ruins of an ancient village just outside Thebes, where generations of craftsmen and artists built and decorated royal tombs.

There, relics reveal the most intimate details of the people's daily lives: their meals, their loves, their quarrels, and even their dreams.

Go inside the pharaohs' most magnificent tombs and see astonishing art and priceless treasures.

Meet the scribes, stonemasons, and high priests who presided over this city of the dead.

Learn the secrets of the tomb raiders and the tricks devised to thwart them.

This four-part series provides fascinating insights into a civilisation now lost to the ages. [endtext]

John Romer: Ancient Lives [1/4]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/john-romer-ancient-lives-24.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tEjRDK2uOVk

[starttext] How did ordinary Egyptians live in the time of the pharaohs?

Renowned British Egyptologist John Romer explores the ruins of an ancient village just outside Thebes, where generations of craftsmen and artists built and decorated royal tombs.

There, relics reveal the most intimate details of the people's daily lives: their meals, their loves, their quarrels, and even their dreams.

Go inside the pharaohs' most magnificent tombs and see astonishing art and priceless treasures.

Meet the scribes, stonemasons, and high priests who presided over this city of the dead.

Learn the secrets of the tomb raiders and the tricks devised to thwart them.

This four-part series provides fascinating insights into a civilisation now lost to the ages. [endtext]

John Romer: Ancient Lives [2/4]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/john-romer-ancient-lives-34.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX7nMXFW-xE

[starttext] How did ordinary Egyptians live in the time of the pharaohs?

Renowned British Egyptologist John Romer explores the ruins of an ancient village just outside Thebes, where generations of craftsmen and artists built and decorated royal tombs.

There, relics reveal the most intimate details of the people's daily lives: their meals, their loves, their quarrels, and even their dreams.

Go inside the pharaohs' most magnificent tombs and see astonishing art and priceless treasures.

Meet the scribes, stonemasons, and high priests who presided over this city of the dead.

Learn the secrets of the tomb raiders and the tricks devised to thwart them.

This four-part series provides fascinating insights into a civilisation now lost to the ages. [endtext]

John Romer: Ancient Lives [3/4]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/john-romer-ancient-lives-44.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uPBz5q0n8LE

[starttext] How did ordinary Egyptians live in the time of the pharaohs?

Renowned British Egyptologist John Romer explores the ruins of an ancient village just outside Thebes, where generations of craftsmen and artists built and decorated royal tombs.

There, relics reveal the most intimate details of the people's daily lives: their meals, their loves, their quarrels, and even their dreams.

Go inside the pharaohs' most magnificent tombs and see astonishing art and priceless treasures.

Meet the scribes, stonemasons, and high priests who presided over this city of the dead.

Learn the secrets of the tomb raiders and the tricks devised to thwart them.

This four-part series provides fascinating insights into a civilisation now lost to the ages. [endtext]

John Romer: Ancient Lives [4/4]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/richard-dawkins-enemies-of-reason-12.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0CyMglakWoo

[starttext] Is it rational that the dead can communicate with the living and give sound advice on how they should live their lives?

What about sticking pins into your body to free the flow of Chi energy and cure your illness?

Or the bending of spoons using your mind alone?

Is that rational?

Richard Dawkins doesn't think so, and feels it is his duty to expose those areas of belief that exist without scientific proof, yet manage to hold the nation under their spell.

He will take on the world's leading proponents in their field of expertise, meet the victims who have used them and expose the history of the movements -- from the charlatans who have milked these practices to the experiments and testing that have failed to produce conclusive results. [endtext]

Richard Dawkins: The Enemies of Reason [1/2]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/03/richard-dawkins-enemies-of-reason-22.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCJoOJlP8PI

[starttext] Is it rational that the dead can communicate with the living and give sound advice on how they should live their lives?

What about sticking pins into your body to free the flow of Chi energy and cure your illness?

Or the bending of spoons using your mind alone?

Is that rational?

Richard Dawkins doesn't think so, and feels it is his duty to expose those areas of belief that exist without scientific proof, yet manage to hold the nation under their spell.

He will take on the world's leading proponents in their field of expertise, meet the victims who have used them and expose the history of the movements -- from the charlatans who have milked these practices to the experiments and testing that have failed to produce conclusive results. [endtext]

Richard Dawkins: The Enemies of Reason [2/2]


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/02/ao-last-neanderthal.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKJHbl1fSRk

[starttext] When his clan, including his wife and baby girl Nea, are massacred, Ao, a desperate Neandertal man, decides to leave the North country where he has been living for the South where he was born.

His aim is to join his twin brother, from whom he was separated when he was nine.

On his long and adventurous way home, he meets Aki, a Homo Sapiens woman... [endtext]

Ao: The Last Neanderthal


[postlink]http://archaeotube.blogspot.com/2014/02/coelacanth-fish-that-time-forgot.html[/postlink]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wcz_jHuYGd8

[starttext] It was thriving long before the dinosaurs ruled the Earth, and scientists thought it had died out more than 65 million years ago. But in 1938, fishermen on a South African trawler netted a massive, scaly, blue-gray fish, and suddenly the long-extinct creature from the depths was back, stunning scientists and capturing headlines across the world.

The coelacanth story has more improbable twists than a crime thriller. The chance discovery in 1938 was topped by a bizarre stroke of fate in 1997, thousands of miles away from the original find. A marine biologist was casually strolling through a fish market in Indonesia when he spotted a new subspecies lying on a slab in a fish market. That find triggered a renewed hunt for the elusive creature in the wild. When a submersible finally revealed the fish's underwater lair, scientists were greeted with video images of coelacanths performing a bizarre "headstand" dance in the depths.

But having survived the theorized meteor strike that killed off the dinosaurs, will this hardy creature now withstand the attention from museums, aquariums, and media, all eager to acquire a specimen of their own?  [endtext]

Coelacanth: The Fish That Time Forgot